Hamsa Stainton

Assistant Professor, Religious Studies
Undergraduate Director
Primary office:
785-864-5568
Smith Hall
Room 106


Hinduism; Sanskrit poetry, literature and aesthetics; devotion and prayer; Shaivism and Tantric traditions (especially from Kashmir); historiography; the Mahabharata; Indian Buddhism

Ph.D., Columbia University

Hamsa Stainton's research interests include Hinduism; Sanskrit poetry, literature and aesthetics; devotion and prayer; Shaivism and Tantric traditions (especially from Kashmir); historiography; the Mahabharata; Indian Buddhism; and Hinduism outside of India. He studied at Cornell University, Harvard Divinity School, and Columbia University. He has been studying South Asian religions for over a decade and has spent significant time living, traveling, and studying in India. His current research focuses on a specific genre of Sanskrit devotional poetry called the stotra (loosely translated as 'hymn of praise') in the religious and literary history of Kashmir, one of the most dynamic centers of Sanskrit learning in South Asia.


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